Causes of horse injuries deep digital flexor tendon injury

Print off the Owner factsheet on Tendon injuries to give to your clients. Less clear in many cases with much less research having been conducted than in the SDFT. Exercise, fatigue and degenerative changes may be involved, most commonly in the digital sheath and distal phalangeal regions.

Causes of horse injuries deep digital flexor tendon injury

Tendons and ligament injuries Tendon injuries Tendons are the strap-like elastic structures that attach muscles to the bones of which they act on. Most tendons are relatively short and rarely damaged. However the long tendons of the limbs are vulnerable to damage during exercise or as a result of trauma.

The flexor tendons are the most important structures of which are discussed below. At the level of the knee and hock along with the fetlock and pastern region the tendons are enclosed by a fluid filled sheath.

Several strong, short annular ligaments help to keep the tendons in place in regions of high movement such as joints.

The tendons themselves are composed of longitudinally arranged bundles of fibres. Blood supply to tendons and ligaments are poor compared to muscles and other tissues.

The different types of tendon injuries Injury to these tendons commonly occurs during exercise.

Causes of horse injuries deep digital flexor tendon injury

Strenuous exercise can result in tearing of fibres especially in unfit horses. Even fit horses which are over stretching tendons in fast work or on unlevel ground or during jumping at speed can damage these structures.

The degree of damage can range from minor, with minimal fibre damage to severe with total tendon rupture. Most frequently, a proportion of fibres are damaged in a localised area within the tendon called a zone.

This may form a discrete hole which extends for a variable length of the tendon. A knock to a tendon may result in slight bruising or severe damage leading to tendon rupture.

Sharp trauma which cuts through the skin can vary from minor tendon damage to partial or full thickness laceration of the tendon. If a tendon sheath is involved these can lead to potentially life threatening infection if not dealt with promptly.

First signs of tendon injury Damage to a tendon usually results in inflammation which we commonly feel as heat and swelling. Minor fibre damage leads to slight enlargement of the affected part of the tendon which feels warmer than the corresponding area of the opposite limb.

Mild sprains often do not cause lameness. If there is severe damage, the limb can become very painful, with the toe tipped upwards or the fetlock may sink at the walk. In cases of tendon sheath sepsis the horse will also be very lame.The two flexor tendons are the superficial digital flexor and the deep digital flexor that course the back surface of the cannon bone and insert on the pastern bones and the coffin bone, respectively.

Tearing of the deep digital flexor tendon within the hoof may be part of the same process that causes degeneration of the navicular bone and inflammation within the navicular bursa.

This is an important cause of lameness that is localized to the heel with nerve blocks. The flexor tendons consist of the superficial digital flexor and the deep digital flexor. At the February International Hoof-Care Summit, Metamora, Mich., equine veterinarian Roland Thaler spoke about tendon injuries and how farriers can assist in their treatment.

3 common equine tendon & ligament injuries and ways to treat them. Deep Digital Flexor Tendon Injury.

What Are the Treatments for Deep Digital Flexor Tendon Injuries in Horses? | Animals - metin2sell.com

The deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) arises from three locations in the upper forelimb: the humerus, radius, and ulna.

If you suspect your horse has an acute tendon or ligament injury, work with your veterinarian and start therapies. Tendon and ligament injuries are common causes of equine lameness, responsible for up to 30 percent of lameness in athletic horses by some estimates. fetlock and stifle; deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) injuries can occur behind the cannon bone, at the pastern or low in the foot.

setting the horse up for re-injury when going back to. Tendon and ligament injuries are common causes of equine lameness, responsible for up to 30 percent of lameness in athletic horses by some estimates.

fetlock and stifle; deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) injuries can occur behind the cannon bone, at the pastern or low in the foot. setting the horse up for re-injury when going back to.

Anyone else experience a deep digital flexor tendon injury? - The Horse Forum